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Does anyone have LSTD 302 final exam for AMU/APUS. I have all the core classes f
Read 4919 times | 17 Replies

Reply# 14
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Posts: 11381
Points: 1225
Rep:  +692   -1

Does anyone have LSTD 302 final exam for AMU/APUS. I have all the core classes f
Dec 15, 2012

Looking for the answers to LSTD 302 Final.

Hi Lita, make a note request here: http://biology-forums.com/index.php?action=form;n=9

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Reply# 15
Psychman
Guest
Does anyone have LSTD 302 final exam for AMU/APUS. I have all the core classes f
Dec 15, 2012

PM me and I will see what I can do...



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Reply# 16
Posts: 35
Points: 208
Rep:  +0   -1

Does anyone have LSTD 302 final exam for AMU/APUS. I have all the core classes f
Dec 19, 2012

LSTD 302 In order QUIZEES 1-4 and MID! {FINAL(TBA)}................OK EVERYONE HERE IT IS Smile

Quiz 1 (due end of week 2)
Return to Assessment List
Part 1 of 1 -    90.0/ 100.0 Points

Question 1 of 10   0.0/ 10.0 Points
The defendant must always prove his or her affirmative defense beyond a reasonable doubt.

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 5
Question 2 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
The prosecution must prove all elements of a crime beyond a reasonable doubt.

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 4
Question 3 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
To meet the intent element required for possession, a defendant should be aware of the possession.

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 4
Question 4 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
Mens rea and scienter mean the same thing.

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 4
Question 5 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
The test for legal causation is “objective foreseeability.”

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 4
Question 6 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
To successfully claim self-defense, the defendant must prove that he or she reasonably believed that he or she was going to be injured or killed unless he or she used self-defense.

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 5
Question 7 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
A perfect defense will result in an acquittal.

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 5
Question 8 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
In general, consent is not voluntary if it is induced by force, threat of force, or trickery.

 

    True

 False





Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 5
Question 9 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
Deadly force can be justified under certain circumstances for the ejection of a trespasser.


 
    True

 False





Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 5
Question 10 of 10   10.0/ 10.0 Points
The Model Penal Code and most states authorize the use of deadly force to protect both real and personal property.


 
    True

 False





Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 5



Post Merge: 20 hours  ago



Quiz 2 (due the end of week 3)

Return to Assessment List

Part 1 of 1 -    70.0/ 100.0 Points

Question 1 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Luring a victim to the scene of the crime generally will NOT meet the criminal act element required for accomplice liability.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 7
Question 2 of 10    0.0/ 10.0 Points
Generally, the M'Naghten test is easier to prove than the irresistible impulse test and M'Naghten results in more acquittals.
Incorrect
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 3 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
The accomplice does not actually have to commit the crime to be responsible for it.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 7
Question 4 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Defenses based on excuse focus on the defendant and claim that the defendant should be excused from criminal responsibility for his or her conduct under the circumstances.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 5 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Under the natural and probable consequences doctrine, if the defendant assists the principal with the intent to further a specific crime's commission, and the principal commits a different crime that is foreseeable at the time of the defendant's assistance, the defendant could be liable as an accomplice.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 7
Question 6 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Juvenile courts can have exclusive jurisdiction over minors under eighteen, or concurrent or simultaneous jurisdiction with adult courts, depending on the state.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 7 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Mistake of law can provide a defense if the statute defining the offense has been overturned.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 8 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
The subjective entrapment test focuses on the defendant's individual characteristics more than on law enforcement's behavior.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 9 of 10    0.0/ 10.0 Points
Typically, mere presence at the scene of the crime is NOT enough to constitute the criminal act element required for accomplice liability, unless that presence is combined with flight.
Incorrect
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 7
Question 10 of 10    0.0/ 10.0 Points
A principal and an accomplice will be criminally liable for the same crime and therefore sentenced the same.
Incorrect
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 7

   
   
           
   
   
   


Post Merge: 20 hours  ago

 Quiz 3 (due the end of week 5)

Return to Assessment List

Part 1 of 1 -    100.0/ 100.0 Points

Question 1 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
A defendant can commit attempt by plotting or planning an offense.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 2 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Initially at common law, every felonious or criminal homicide was punished by death.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 9
Question 3 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Res ipsa loquitur means “the thing speaks for itself.”
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 4 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
A few states allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with the assistance of a physician.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 9
Question 5 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
The substantial steps test is more likely to result in a conviction because it classifies as “substantial” those acts the other tests might consider only “preparatory.”
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 6 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
In some jurisdictions, a defendant's criminal intent can transfer from the intended victim to the actual victim.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 7 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Solicitation is an inchoate crime because it is possible that the conspiracy will never be formed, and the crime that is its object will not be committed.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 8 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Some jurisdictions do not require any appreciable time lapse between the formation of intent and the criminal act in a premeditated murder.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 9 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
The US Supreme Court has held that criminal homicide is the only crime that can merit the death penalty.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 9
Question 10 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Generally, if a felony is inherently dangerous to life and the defendants intentionally create a situation that is likely to result in death, if a death results then all defendants will be guilty of felony murder. In some jurisdictions, this criminal liability exists even when someone other than a co-felon kills the victim.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 9
Post Merge: 20 hours  ago

 Quiz 4 (due the end of week 6)

Return to Assessment List

Part 1 of 1 -    100.0/ 100.0 Points

Question 1 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Personal property can include intangible property, such as stocks and bonds.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 11
Question 2 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Statistics indicate that rape prosecutions often result in acquittal, making corroborative evidence important to a victim's case.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 10
Question 3 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
 A defendant can commit a battery by shooting a victim with a gun.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 10
Question 4 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
The victim's lack of awareness of the defendant's threatened battery assault criminal act could operate as a failure of proof or affirmative defense.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 10
Question 5 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
 Kidnapping is generally a lesser included offense of false imprisonment.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 10
Question 6 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
A potential failure of proof or affirmative defense to larceny theft is that the defendant was only “borrowing” property and intended to return it after use.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 11
Question 7 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Arson is generally graded as a serious felony.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 11
Question 8 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
The harm element required for criminal mischief is generally damage, destruction, or interference to property.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 11
Question 9 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
All states and the federal government have enacted the Uniform Controlled Substances Act of 1970.
Correct
   
A. True
B. False



Answer Key: True
Question 10 of 10    10.0/ 10.0 Points
Robbery is typically graded more severely than theft under a consolidated theft statute.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 11
Post Merge: 4 seconds  ago

Part 1 of 1 -    79.0/ 100.0 Points

Question 1 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Which of the following is an example of criminal law?
   
   A. Wills and trusts.
   
Correct   
   B. Assault.
   
   
   C. Contracts.

   
   
   D. Torts   



Answer Key: B
Feedback: ch. 1
Question 2 of 22    0.0/ 3.5 Points
A criminal defendant may not be prosecuted under both federal and state criminal laws for the same criminal act.
Incorrect
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 2
Question 3 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
A statute that violates or inhibits fundamental constitutional protections is presumptively invalid.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 3
Question 4 of 22    0.0/ 3.5 Points
An example of an “omission to act” crime is:

   
   A. statutory rape.
   
   
   B. jaywalking.
   
Incorrect   
   C. possession of illegal drugs.
   
   
   D. failure to pay income taxes.
   



Answer Key: D
Feedback: ch. 4
Question 5 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The defendant can be the initial aggressor and still raise a self-defense claim in some jurisdictions if the defendant withdraws from the attack and the attacked individual persists.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 5
Question 6 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
A defendant who is found guilty but mentally ill is acquitted and committed to a treatment facility.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 7 of 22    0.0/ 3.5 Points
Typically, mere presence at the scene of the crime is NOT enough to constitute the criminal act element required for accomplice liability, unless that presence is combined with flight.
Incorrect
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 7
Question 8 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
A theory of liability whereby an employer may be held liable for an employee's actions is called:
Correct   
   A. respondeat superior.   
   
   B. strict liability.
   
   
   C. general liability.

   
   
   D. c. culpability
   



Answer Key: A
Feedback: ch. 1
Question 9 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The three branches of the federal government are detailed in Articles I-III of the US Constitution.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 2
Question 10 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Ex post facto protection applies only to criminal laws.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 3
Question 11 of 22    0.0/ 3.5 Points
“Constructive possession” means that:
   
   A. the defendant has the item on his or her person.

   
Correct   
   B. the item is not on the defendant's person, but is within the defendant's area of control.
   
   
   C.  another person possesses the item.
   
   
   D. all of the above.
   



Answer Key: B
Feedback: ch. 4
Question 12 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
If the defendant honestly but unreasonably believes self-defense is necessary under the circumstances, a claim of imperfect self-defense may reduce the severity of the offense.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 5
Question 13 of 22    0.0/ 3.5 Points
The victim's opinion is one factor a court will consider when deciding whether or not to waive jurisdiction of a juvenile to adult court.
Incorrect
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 14 of 22    0.0/ 3.5 Points
Most states frown on the use of involuntary intoxication as a defense, and allow it only to reduce the severity of the crime charged.
Incorrect
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 6
Question 15 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
With vicarious liability, the acting defendant is NOT criminally responsible for his or her conduct.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 7
Question 16 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Debra, a police officer on patrol in her vehicle, slowly passes John's vehicle. Both cars have their windows rolled down. Debra believes she can smell marijuana coming from John's vehicle. She pulls John's vehicle over and observes John stuffing something under the seat. She uses her flashlight to look under the seat and finds bags of marijuana. John is arrested. John's attorney moves to have the charges dismissed, saying Debra needed a warrant before looking under the seat of John's car. This is a question of criminal procedure.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 1
Question 17 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
A public defender will be appointed to a defendant who cannot afford an attorney and who:
Correct   
   A. is facing incarceration.
   
   
   B. must pay a fine.is charged with an infraction.

   
   
   C. none of the above.   



Answer Key: A
Feedback: ch. 1
Question 18 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Who has the power to veto statutes proposed by Congress?
Correct   
   A. The president.

   
   
   B. The US Supreme Court.
   
   
   C. The US Senate.
   
   
   D. The House of Representatives.
   



Answer Key: A
Feedback: ch. 2
Question 19 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
State courts are exclusive and can only adjudicate state court matters.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 2
Question 20 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The US Supreme Court has held that the Second Amendment does NOT apply only to the militia.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 3
Question 21 of 22    15.0/ 15.0 Points
Briefly explain the use of voluntary intoxication as a defense and give an example.

Please answer thoroughly and list your references in Bluebook format.

Please use a minimum of 250 words in your essay answer.

In the past voluntary intoxication was a defense for those suspected of a committing a crime. But in the 19th Century or so, the courts began to shift their attitudes on intoxication. This new attitude reminded offender that their actions would no longer be tolerated and or given sympathy for their actions while intoxicated. What really changed the Courts vision on voluntary intoxication as a defense was the increasing number of crimes that were on the rise. Some scholars suggest that the strong association between violent crimes and voluntary intoxication was becoming too high. In the State of Montana, they responded to rising concerns regarding intoxicated offenders that are involved in criminal activities. So shortly after, Montana amended their legislature to read “A person who is in an intoxicated condition is criminally responsible for his conduct and an intoxicated condition is not a defense to any offense and may not be taken into consideration in determining the existence of a mental state which is an element of the offense unless the defendant proves that he did not know that it was an intoxicating substance when he consumed, smoked, sniffed, injected or otherwise ingested the substance causing the condition” [1]. A good case example of this is Montana v. Egelhoff, 518 U.S. 37, 56 (1996), where the US Supreme Court upheld the ruling and the revised statue of Montana. In Courts final statement on voluntary intoxication state “the Due Process Clause did not require the admission of voluntary intoxication evidence” [2] .















Reference



[1] Montana Code ANN. § 45-2-203 (1997) – Voluntary Intoxication as a Defense.

[2] Montana v. Egelhoff, 518 U.S. 37, 56 (1996)


Model Short Answer: ch. 6



Feedback: ch. 6
Comment:

Nice work on this first essay question. You thoroughly and correctly explained how voluntary intoxication can be used as a defense. You properly listed an example of this defense.

Nice work in conducting research and listing your references in Bluebook format.

Below is the "textbook" answer.


According to the legal dictionary, intoxication refers to the state in which a person's normal capacity to act or reason is inhibited by alcohol or drugs.[1] Society has accepted that a normal state of functioning is the ability to walk in a straight line, talk without slurring and maintain a steady level of reaction time to any given incident. Generally, when a person is intoxicated, they are incoherent and incapable of acting as an ordinary prudent and cautious person would act under similar conditions. The law in some jurisdictions may allow intoxication to be used as a defense to certain crimes under the notion that an intoxicated person cannot possess the physical and mental requisites necessary to institute the offense.[2] However, intoxication in itself does not constitute a mental disease and is not a defense unless it negatives an element of the offense.[3] For an offense or act to be considered criminal, it must obtain the required element of voluntary. More specifically, the defendant must voluntarily control the offense.[4]

When a person knowingly performs the act of ingesting drugs or alcohol, the requirement of voluntary has been met and any conduct that occurs after the ingestion is not likely to be excused in court unless the level of intoxication renders the defendant to a point of incapacitation preventing them from forming the criminal intent required for the offense. It is rare that a voluntary intoxication intent crime will provide an imperfect defense.[5] For instance, a man goes to a bar with the intention on having a couple alcoholic beverages and voluntarily ends up drinking past his level of capacitation. After a few hours pass and the man decides to leave the bar, he is now most likely beyond his level of normal competency. He decides to stop at a convenient store and holds the cashier at gun point. In court, an attorney would possibly argue that the man was beyond a level of coherency and did not possess the mental state to understand what he was doing was wrong. In some circumstances, this defense of voluntary intoxication may be allowed in court, but most likely will only lessen the sentence or charges against the individual. Examples of voluntary intoxication incidents are common, but it is important to understand that each state and jurisdiction handle them on different levels.

In conclusion, most states frown on the use of voluntary intoxication as a defense, and allow it only to reduce the severity of the crime charged. If a defendant voluntarily undertakes action, such as drinking or ingesting drugs, the voluntary act requirement is met. Conduct that occurs after the voluntary intoxication probably is not excused unless the intoxication prevents the defendant from forming the criminal intent required for the offense. [6]

Notes

[1] Intoxication, The Legal Dictionary, 2012, available at http://legal-dictionary.t...ctionary.com/intoxication (last visited November 30, 2012).

[2] Id.

[3] Model Penal Code § 2.08 (1)(3).

[4] Lisa M. Storm, Criminal Law 89 (2012).

[5] Lisa M. Storm, Criminal Law 159 (2012).

[6] Lisa M. Storm, Criminal Law (2012).
Question 22 of 22    15.0/ 15.0 Points
When can a defendant legally use deadly force in self-defense?

Please give examples to support your answer.

Please answer thoroughly and list your references in Bluebook format.

Please use a minimum of 250 words in your essay answer.

When can a defendant legally use deadly force in self-defense?



Self defense is a touchy subject especially when combined with the use of deadly force. The use of deadly force can vary from state to state and is implemented slight different for law enforcement officer to civilians. Police officers may use deadly force in specific circumstances when they are trying to enforce the law. Ordinary citizens are authorized to use deadly force in certain circumstance for self defense. Now there are rules that manage the use of deadly force for law enforcement that do not apply to citizens. But it is important to remember that we are all subject to the some stipulation of the laws no matter who we are or work for.

So the question is when a defendant can legally use deadly force in self defense. When law enforcement officer are attempting to arrest or arrest a person for a felony crime such as murder, the Courts have granted some flexibility to them only. Law enforcement officer may use all the force required that may be essential to stop any possible resistance which includes killing that person. However, Tennessee v. Garner, 471 U.S. 1, 105 S. Ct. 1694, 85 L. Ed. 2d 1 (1985) ruling concluded that We conclude that such force may not be used unless it is necessary to prevent the escape and the officer has probable cause to believe that the suspect poses a significant threat of death or serious physical injury to the officer or others” from Justice White, Byron [1].

Citizens on the other hand are not grant the flexibility to use the reasonableness rule like law enforcement officers. Citizens have to show proof that felony (murder, armed robbery ect) is or has taken placed which endangers the lives of themselves or others. Citizens cannot use suspicion as grounds for deadly force being used rather they have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. People v. Couch, 436 Mich. 414, 461 N.W.2d 683 (1990), was a great case that proved my conclusion on use of deadly force. In a short summary it was about a defendant who shot and killed what he thought was a suspected felon leaving the crime scene. The courts found Mr. Couch guilty because he did not have sufficient proof in order to use deadly force against the suspect due to fact no imminent danger was posed to him or the public



Reference



[1] Tennessee v. Garner, 471 U.S. 1, 105 S. Ct. 1694, 85 L. Ed. 2d 1 (1985) – Use of force for police officers



[2] People v. Couch, 436 Mich. 414, 461 N.W.2d 683 (1990) - Use of force for citizens



Model Short Answer: ch. 5
Feedback: ch. 5
Comment:    Well done!

Please see the textbook answer below.



***

When can a defendant legally use deadly force in self-defense?

Self-defense is a reasonable amount of physical force used to protect oneself from what can be justified as an aggressive attack. Assault, battery, and criminal homicide are examples of when self-defense may be used. When the said defense against an attacker is countered with the use of a knife, gun, vehicle, bare hands, or any other object that can produce an end result of extremely serious injury or even death, the defense is referred to as deadly force.[1] In general, there are four elements required to a self-defense claim that a defendant must establish for justification. First and foremost, the defendant must be able to prove that they were not an instigator or provoker of the attack. Second, the defendant must prove that injury or death was forthcoming. Third, the defendant must prove that the level of force used was within reasonable measures pending the circumstance. Lastly, the defendant must prove that a reasonable level of fear was present to suggest serious injury or death would occur without the use of self-defense.[2]
The defendant cannot successfully claim self-defense unless the degree of force used is objectively reasonable under the circumstances. In general, deadly force can be employed in self-defense when a reasonable person feels threatened with imminent death, serious bodily injury, and, in some jurisdictions, a serious felony. “Serious bodily injury” and “serious felony” are technical terms that are defined in a statute or case, depending on the jurisdiction. The Model Penal Code cites the use of deadly force as justifiable to protect against death, serious bodily harm, kidnapping, or sexual intercourse compelled by force or threat. [3]
[1] Lisa M. Storm, Criminal Law (2012).
[2] Lisa M. Storm, Criminal Law (2012).
[3] Lisa M. Storm, Criminal Law (2012).
Post Merge: Dec 20, 2012

Part 1 of 1 -    100.0/ 100.0 Points

Question 1 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
A general attempt statute is one that:
   
   A. defines attempt very generally.

   
   
   B. dictates only the punishment available for attempt.
   
   
   C. defines attempt according to individual crimes.
   
Correct    
   D. sets forth attempt elements and applies them to any criminal offense.    



Answer Key: D
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 2 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
At common law, the criminal intent element of murder was malice aforethought.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 9
Question 3 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Neither the federal government nor the Model Penal Code recognizes the crime of stalking.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 10
Question 4 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
A potential failure of proof or affirmative defense to false pretenses theft is that the victim did not transfer property in reliance on the defendant’s statements.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 11
Question 5 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Generally, an attendant circumstance of disturbing the peace is that the conduct take place in a specific location.

   
True
Correct
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 12
Question 6 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Unlawful assembly can be the predicate offense to:
Correct    
   A. riot.
   
   
   B. failure to disperse.
   
   
   C. disorderly conduct.
   
   
   D. criminal gang activity.
   



Answer Key: A
Feedback: ch. 12
Question 7 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Which of the following is prohibited as a terrorist crime in the US Code?
   
   A. Harboring or concealing terrorists.
   
   
   B. Financing of terrorism.
   
   
   C. Use of a weapon of mass destruction.

   
Correct    
   D. All of the above.    



Answer Key: D
Feedback: ch. 13
Question 8 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Criminal statutes protecting the government are primarily found at the state level.


   
True
Correct
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 13
Question 9 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The substantial steps test is more likely to result in a conviction because it classifies as “substantial” those acts the other tests might consider only “preparatory.”
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 8
Question 10 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
A deadly weapon is:
   
   A. any instrument that is specifically designed to cause death or serious bodily injury.

   
Correct    
   B. any instrument that can kill when used in a manner calculated to cause death or serious bodily injury.
   
   
   C. any instrument that a defendant intends to cause death or serious bodily injury.
   
   
   D. any instrument that the victim believes can cause death or serious bodily injury.
   



Answer Key: B
Feedback: ch. 9
Question 11 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The victim’s lack of awareness of the defendant’s threatened battery assault criminal act could operate as a failure of proof or affirmative defense.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 10
Question 12 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
If a defendant erroneously takes an item, believing it to belong to the defendant, that is:
   
   A. an affirmative defense based on consent.

   
   
   B. an imperfect defense.
   
Correct   
   C. a mistake of fact defense.
   
    
   D. not a defense to larceny theft.    



Answer Key: C
Feedback: ch. 11
Question 13 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The first federal law prohibiting sedition was the Sedition Act, which was enacted in 1798.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 13
Question 14 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Although there are many types of sabotage, generally sabotage is impeding the nation’s ability to prepare for or participate in war or national defense.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 13
Question 15 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The USA PATRIOT Act stands for United States of America Protecting Against Terrorists Regulating International Offenses and Torture Act of 2001.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 13
Question 16 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
Robert is convicted of 2nd degree robbery. He is sentenced using first degree felony sentencing guidelines after evidence is introduced that he committed his crime as a part of a gang-related incident. This is an example of:

   
   A. gang participation statute.
   
Correct    
   B. gang enhancement statute.
   
   
   C. gang control statute.
   
   
   D. civil gang injunction.    



Answer Key: B
Feedback: ch. 12
Question 17 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
If a statute prohibits conduct that involves an individual’s assembling, or speech, the statute must be narrowly tailored and supported by a compelling government interest.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 12
Question 18 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
In many jurisdictions, the criminal intent element required for disorderly conduct is the specific intent or purposely to cause public inconvenience, annoyance or alarm, or the reckless intent to cause a risk thereof.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 12
Question 19 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The criminal intent element for failure to disperse can be recklessly or negligently.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: False
Feedback: ch. 12
Question 20 of 22    3.5/ 3.5 Points
The criminal act element required for prostitution varies depending on the jurisdiction.
Correct
   
True
False



Answer Key: True
Feedback: ch. 12
Question 21 of 22    15.0/ 15.0 Points
Explain the difference between international terrorism and domestic terrorism. Describe an example of each.

Discuss fully and list your references in Bluebook format.

Please note that your essay answer should contain a minimum of 250 words.



Model Short Answer: ch. 13
Feedback: ch. 13
Question 22 of 22    15.0/ 15.0 Points
Please define “quality of life crimes.” What is the purpose of having these crimes in the statutes? What are some examples of these types of crimes?

Discuss fully and please list your references in Bluebook format.

Please note your essay answer should contain at least 250 words.




Model Short Answer: ch. 12
Feedback: ch. 12[/font]



Last Edit: Dec 20, 2012 by airbornerange Report this PostReport AbuseLike this PostLike
Reply# 17
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Does anyone have LSTD 302 final exam for AMU/APUS. I have all the core classes f
Dec 28, 2012

I have just posted the LSTD-302 new Quiz 3 questions with answers....



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