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A week ago Edited: A week ago, bio_man
Here are the multiple choice answers:
A. men are considered to have no power because women have ownership of the livestock.
B. women enjoy a high degree of equality because the group has very little property to pass on.
C. If men work and women stay home in a society
D. women's lives tend to be more highly controlled because men want to make sure that their livestock is passed on to their biological children.
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wrote...
Educator
A week ago
C. If men work and women stay home in a society

I think option ( D ) is incomplete
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wrote...
Educator
A week ago
o   The role of women in foraging and horticultural based societies.

In a foraging society the work is equally valued of men and women; however it is recognized that men tend to hunt better. There is vital communication between the two sexes; which, lets each other know what animals or vegetation the other has seen on their outings. The women are responsible for collecting plants and roots, while the men are responsible for hunting. “The women are the primary gathers and are responsible for contributing nearly 80% of the San diet.” (Nowak & Laird, 2010)

In a horticultural society men and women have specific roles for contributing to group. Just as men have more experience with hunting and knowledge of animals; women have more experience and knowledge of plants and roots. Women rarely cross over into men’s roles and men rarely cross over into women’s roles, however it is allowed even though it is acknowledged that men and women are better at their prescribed roles. “In horticultural societies, the sexual division of labor evolved out of the foraging mode of living.” (Nowak & Laird, 2010)

o   How a woman’s status is impacted by her participation in food procurement.

“Anthropologists argue that as in foraging societies, women’s central role in horticultural production provides them with cultural value and decision-making authority.” (Nowak & Laird, 2010) In some societies/tribes the women own the home and have influence over whether or not to raid another tribe. Men realize the importance of maintaining the home while they were out hunting or raiding. In both foraging and horticultural societies women are revered for their participation in food procurement.

o   How a woman’s status in these societies, compares to that of women in American society today.

In foraging and horticultural societies women have very specifically defined roles but are respected for them. Their opinions and knowledge is sought out by the men. Although, sometimes a woman is allowed to participate in the men’s role if so desired. By these standards, women from these cultures are not so different from American women today. However, it could be said that those foraging and horticultural women actually are more revered then today’s American woman. American women have freedom to take any role or job position they desire. This has actually devalued the importance of a woman’s ‘knowledge’ because they are no longer the primary caretaker or keeper of family traditions/histories. Our great-grandmothers of the past were looked to for home remedies, family tree histories, and secret family food recipes. American women now are so worried about status that the typical all-American family has been lost.
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