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wrote...
A month ago
SERT is a completely different protein whose simple job is to vacuum up the serotonin once it's no longer needed.

Referring to following image, the role of SERT should be on stage 4, Serotonin action is terminated via removal of serotonin molecules from the synaptic space to (presynaptic membrane) nerve terminal through Serotonin transporter.  I would like to know on how the role of SERT play on this process.



Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)

wrote...
Educator
A month ago
As mentioned in my previous post, SERT acts as a vacuum, taking serotonin back into the nerve to be used again.

That's its only role. Relating back to your original question, those with SAD, according to the study referenced have more SERT produced, so more "vacuuming".
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wrote...
A month ago
With less Sunlight, I would like to know on which following is correct or not

1) serotonin synthesis would be less active, and SERT vacuuming role remain same performance.

2) serotonin synthesis remain same performance, but SERT vacuuming role would be more active.

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)


wrote...
Educator
A month ago
Neither. (2) is more right, except the "vacuuming" happens more because there are more "vacuums"
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wrote...
A month ago Edited: A month ago, oem7110
I would like to know on why SERT vacuuming process is more active / efficient in term of performance with less Sunlight.  What elements within SERT relate to process efficiency with less Sunlight?  On the other words, Sunlight would suppress any process with SERT in term of efficiency.

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)





Post Merge: A month ago

The less SERT, the longer serotonin stays in the cleft and the more likely it is to activate serotonin receptors. Thus, the longer its effects.

If longer serotonin stays in the cleft and get a higher chances to activate serotonin receptors, I would like to know on how this process related to emotion (less depression).


Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
A month ago Edited: A month ago, bio_man
External factors, like the sun, cannot encourage the formation of proteins directly. Rarely do external factors influence a gene directly, unless it's a cancerous source. That being said, the link I provided on page 1 only states that there's a connection between SAD and SERT, but does not provide a biochemical pathway. In fact, it might not even be the sun! I couldn't find any literature either between sun exposure and SERT production after searching, so they probably haven't made that connection yet or one doesn't exist. If it were the sun, hypothetically speaking, it wouldn't act directly on the protein -- that's impossible because these neurons are in the brain.

If longer serotonin stays in the cleft and get a higher chances to activate serotonin receptors, I would like to know on how this process related to emotion (less depression).

You're asking how does serotonin affect one's emotions. For this we'd have to research the biochemical pathways associated with serotonin. That's something I do not have much information about currently, but I'll research it further and then update this thread -- or you can start a fresh new topic -- it's up to you
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wrote...
A month ago Edited: A month ago, oem7110
Let zoom out the box - biochemical pathways, for activating serotonin receptors, I would like to know what purpose of processing signals are through following process (1) & (2) and how the quality of signals are different if serotonin stays longer within the cleft. On the other hands, do the processing signal relates to send commend from the brain to move the leg, that kind of purpose?

1) serotonin synthesis  
2) SERT vacuuming

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
A month ago Edited: A month ago, bio_man
I would like to know what purpose of processing signals are through following process (1) & (2) and how the quality of signals are different if serotonin stays longer within the cleft.

With neurons, there's this notion called the "all-or-nothing" principle, which means that a neuron only fires if enough of a signal is present. Anything less than what it needs to activate the initial action potential will not elicit a response. Anything more than what it needs to initiate the action potential will give the same signal regardless.


On the other hands, do the processing signal relates to send commend from the brain to move the leg, that kind of purpose?

Serotonin has little to do with leg movement.
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wrote...
A month ago
If longer serotonin stays in the cleft and get a higher chances to activate serotonin receptors,

If there are higher chances to activate serotonin receptors, would the frequency of impulsing signals is higher on postsynaptic neuron?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
A month ago Edited: A month ago, bio_man
If there are higher chances to activate serotonin receptors, would the frequency of impulsing signals is higher on postsynaptic neuron?

As soon as the threshold of the postsynaptic neuron is met, the response is the same moving forward.

In other words, regardless of how many serotonin receptors are activated, as soon as the threshold is reached, an action potential will follow, BUT it must reach that threshold first (whatever that threshold may be -- it's not important).
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wrote...
A month ago Edited: A month ago, oem7110
It implied that if there are higher chances to activate serotonin receptors, the frequency of impulsing signals would be higher on postsynaptic neuron. 

If Brain sends impulsing signals to kidney for releasing hormone, I would like to know on how kidney responses differently based on following conditions:

1) frequency of impulse signals is 60 times per minute
2) frequency of impulse signals is 10 times per minute

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)

Post Merge: A month ago

Starting around 5:00 about postsynaptic neuron

Post Merge: A month ago

Starting at 8:50, "cocaine blocks that reuptake, especially of dopamine, allowing these powerful chemicals to float around and accumulate - makinng the user feel eiphoric for a time, but also paranoid and jittery. And because you have a limited supply of these neurotransmitters, and your body needs time to brew more, flooding your synapses like this eventually depletes your supply, making you feel terrible in a number of ways"

Would running out of supply lead to depression as described above?
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
1) frequency of impulse signals is 60 times per minute 2) frequency of impulse signals is 10 times per minute

That's not how neurons work. It's not a matter of frequency, as most biological processes work on feedback loops. If a neuron is activated, and its response activates a negative feedback loop, the next impulse to that nerve will not occur because biological processes will inhibit it.

If after the neuron is activated, and its response initiates a positive feedback loop, then the neuron will re-activate to produce more of what it's programmed to activate.

There's also the absolute refractory period that a neuron needs to overcome. This is the period of time during which a second action potential ABSOLUTELY cannot be initiated, no matter how large the applied stimulus is.
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wrote...
Educator
A month ago
Would running out of supply lead to depression as described above?

What's that in reference to?
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wrote...
A month ago
Starting at 8:50, "cocaine blocks that reuptake, especially of dopamine, allowing these powerful chemicals to float around and accumulate - makinng the user feel eiphoric for a time, but also paranoid and jittery. And because you have a limited supply of these neurotransmitters, and your body needs time to brew more, flooding your synapses like this eventually depletes your supply, making you feel terrible in a number of ways"



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