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wrote...
Posts: 810
3 weeks ago
I would like to know on any related articles about how do atmospheric pressure effect on UV.

Does anyone have any suggestions?
Thanks in advance for any suggestions
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wrote...
3 weeks ago
I didn't find correlation between pressure and UV light. I only find correlation between temperature and UV light. What made you think pressure and UV light are connected?
wrote...
3 weeks ago
Do you find correlation between pressure and temperature?
Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
3 weeks ago
As the temperature increases, the molecules in the gas move faster, impacting the gas's container more frequently and exerting a greater force. This increases the pressure. And similarly As the pressure goes up, the temperature also goes up. So the temperature and the pressure is directly proportional to each other.

Ideal gas law: PV=nRT

Variables explained below Downwards Arrow

I would like to know on any related articles about how do atmospheric pressure effect on UV.

Does anyone have any suggestions?
Thanks in advance for any suggestions


In terms of UV radiation and atmospheric pressure, I don't see a correlation either. Atmospheric pressure has to do with gravity and air molecules.
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wrote...
Educator
3 weeks ago
Explained simpler below Downwards Arrow

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wrote...
3 weeks ago
Do following statement based on the same amount of molecules on atmosphere?
Higher Pressure = same amount of molecules move faster
Lower Pressure = same amount of molecules move slower

I would like to know on how to interpret higher pressure, air molecules tends to from higher pressure to lower pressure.  For higher pressure, does it mean having more air molecules(mass) or more faster molecules (speed)?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thanks, to everyone very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
3 weeks ago
High pressure situations occur when there are more air molecules in the sky. This happens if a lot of water evaporates into the sky after several days of high temperature around a body of water for example.

After it rains and the clouds clear up, low pressure sets in.

That'll be my last post before bed!
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wrote...
3 weeks ago Edited: 3 weeks ago, oem7110
I think that higher pressure is caused by higher temperature (expanding air volume), so it should be less air molecules in the sky, would it be correct?

Furthermore, referring to following statement, I would like to know on how lower pressure cause rheumatic diseases.

"Our data demonstrate that osteoarthritic patients experience increased joint pain in response to a decrease in pressure, indicating that low atmospheric pressure conditions exacerbate joint pain in these patients."
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15633634

Do you have any suggestions?
Thanks, to everyone very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
3 weeks ago
Quote
I think that higher pressure is caused by higher temperature (expanding air volume), so it should be less air molecules in the sky, would it be correct?

The relationship between temperature and atmospheric pressure is outlined below:

Warm temperature:

Warm air causes air pressure to rise. When air molecules collide, they exert force on each other. When gas molecules are heated, the molecules move more quickly, and the increased velocity causes more collisions. As a result, more force is exerted on each molecule and air pressure increases. Temperature affects air pressure at different altitudes due to a disparity in air density. Given two columns of air at different temperatures, the column of warmer air will experience the same air pressure at a higher altitude that is measured at a lower altitude in the cooler column of air.

Cold temperature:

Cool temperatures cause air pressure to drop. When gas molecules cool, they move more slowly. Decreased velocity results in fewer collisions between molecules and air pressure decreases. Air density plays a role in the correlation between temperature and pressure because warmer air is less dense than cool air, allowing molecules to have more space to collide with greater force. In cooler air, the molecules are closer together. The proximity results in collisions with less force and lower air pressure.

"Our data demonstrate that osteoarthritic patients experience increased joint pain in response to a decrease in pressure, indicating that low atmospheric pressure conditions exacerbate joint pain in these patients."

Here's a better article that'll help explain the phenomenon (attached)
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wrote...
3 weeks ago Edited: 3 weeks ago, oem7110
I would like to know on how lower air pressure cause joint swelling or tenderness, and related to inflammatory. 

Furthermore, how do the air pressure effects on sleeping cycle?
“Our head is made up of pockets of air that we call sinuses. Usually, those pockets of air are at equilibrium with the atmospheric pressure. When there’s a change in that atmospheric pressure, it creates a change in what you’re experiencing in your head and what’s going on in the air around you. That shift is a Migraine trigger.”
https://migraineagain.com/feel-4-ways-barometric-pressure-affects-health/

Is there any related articles talking about this issue?
Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)

Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

“In addition to cold weather, blood pressure may also be affected by a sudden change in weather patterns, such as a weather front or a storm,” said Dr. Sheps. “Your body — and blood vessels — may react to abrupt changes in humidity, atmospheric pressure, cloud cover or wind in much the same way it reacts to cold.”

I would like to know on how blood pressure is affected by a sudden change in weather patterns as well.

Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

When the pressure drops during a cold front, it causes the viscosity, or thickness, of the blood to increase, said Jennifer Vanos, assistant professor in geosciences at Texas Tech, in an interview with Weather.com.(3).
“Diabetics will have more trouble controlling their blood sugar during cold fronts,” she said.

Rapidly dropping blood sugar could also trigger a Migraine attack. Reactive hypoglycemiais when your blood sugar falls quickly, and it usually happens when the sugar rush from high carb or high glucose foods wears off. It’s one of the least understood, but very real, Migraine triggers.

Dropping pressure causes the viscosity, or thickness of the blood to increase, I would like to know on how dropping pressure relates to rapidly dropping blood sugar.
Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

“It could be that barometric pressure affects the viscosity of the fluid that lines joint sacs, or it could be that it triggers the pain responses in the nerve endings of the joint. "
Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

"When the pressure is about to change during the day, he becomes very nervous, distressed and uncomfortable."
https://magicvalley.com/news/local/community/barometric-pressure-changes-cause-sleepless-nights/article_bb4c6fd5-fdcf-5c0d-9b2a-c3e721d3510d.html

I would like to know on what cause this feeling during the changing pressure.

Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

"Some might think rain reduces barometric pressure, prompting people to snooze. Indeed, one study conducted by the Boeing Co. in 2008 - on how pilots are affected by hypoxia - found that lower pressure means less oxygen in the atmosphere, which results in less oxygen in your body, which translates to sluggishness. One of first signs of a lack of oxygen is drowsiness and fatigue"


Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

"When atmospheric pressure decreases, your blood pressure drops, biometeorologist Jennifer Vanos, P.h.D., said in an interview with weather.com. Low temps cause your blood vessels to narrow, meaning on the whole, blood pressure is lower in the summer."

When atmospheric pressure decrease, I would like to confirm on whether blood pressure drops or raise under this situation.
wrote...
3 weeks ago Edited: 3 weeks ago, ryann
Researchers aren’t entirely sure why people experience more pain during certain weather conditions, but pain has been shown to affect sleep in numerous studies.  I think it's mainly depends on the person diet.  However, Changes in weather, which cause changes in atmospheric pressure, can be reflected in blood pressure fluctuations. For example your blood pressure drops when the barometric pressure drops which might cause headache due to pressure difference between the atmosphere and the air-filled sinuses. The problem is exacerbated when the sinuses are congested or blocked for any reason.

changes in barometric pressure and ambient temperature and changes in knee pain severity. Low barometric pressure has a direct effect on blood pressure, and the ability for blood to absorb oxygen.
wrote...
3 weeks ago Edited: 3 weeks ago, oem7110
  changes in barometric pressure and ambient temperature and changes in knee pain severity. Low barometric pressure has a direct effect on blood pressure, and the ability for blood to absorb oxygen.

Could you please describe more on how barometric pressure effect on blood pressure, and the ability for blood to absorb oxygen?

 Do you have any suggestions?
Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions
Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

"Changes in weather, which cause changes in atmospheric pressure, can be reflected in blood pressure fluctuations. According to a study published in the Journal of Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy in 2001, changes in air pressure do result in changes in blood pressure. This study, titled: "Close Association Between Day-to-day Fluctuation of Atmospheric Pressure and Blood Pressure", studied over 400 individuals, concluding that there was a correlation between the fluctuations of the atmospheric pressure, and blood pressure readings on a day-to-day basis."

I would like to know on how the fluctuations of the atmospheric pressure effects on blood pressure as well.

Post Merge: 3 weeks ago

"in the presence of stronger wind and higher relative humidity, low-frequency electric currents and atmospheric pressure fluctuations negatively affect human physiological state and increase blood pressure, thus increasing the risk of the need for emergency medical assistance. In hypertensive patients, higher blood pressure values were observed on cyclonic days: an increase in blood pressure followed a sudden day-to-day change of the weather pattern going from anti-cyclonic to cyclonic days"
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4377922/

More information relate to this issue.
wrote...
Educator
3 weeks ago
Quote
I would like to know on how lower air pressure cause joint swelling or tenderness, and related to inflammatory.

Scientific data on this matter is at best inconsistent, because it's hard to pinpoint whether it's barometric pressure, humidity, temperature, etc. that's causing the symptoms experienced.

The best study I found regarding this is attached in my post. Mind you, I couldn't find any article explaining why these symptoms occur from a biological standpoint. All the research done are correlational studies.

The best unproven explanation I could find is that low pressure causes your tendons, muscles, and any scar tissue to expand and contract, and that can create pain in joints affected by arthritis. Low temperatures can also make the fluid inside joints thicker, so they feel stiffer. In addition, you might also feel more pain when the weather keeps you from moving around as much as you typically do. People tend to stay indoors and lounge around more when it’s cold and rainy outside, and inactive joints can get stiff and painful.

Hope this helps! Now time to answer the other questions you asked.
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wrote...
Educator
3 weeks ago
Quote
Furthermore, how do the air pressure effects on sleeping cycle?

The sleep–wake cycle is regulated by a circadian process that is independent of prior sleep or wake time and is controlled by an internal biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus deep within the brain. Pressure and humidity may play as a factor externally, contributing to our comfort prior to- or during our sleep, but biologically it wouldn't interfere with our cells making the appropriate chemicals to ignite the sleep-wake. For instance, I like sleep with a light blanket over my body. If the blanket is too heavy, my body overheats causing me to wake up and adjust my sleep position.
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