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wrote...
Educator
A month ago
"rewiring" your perception would require your neurons to form different connections than those formerly established -- that's all there is to it biologically, not much more I can add.

As mentioned, you need to make a conscious effort, strong-willed to be willing to make this change.
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wrote...
A month ago Edited: A month ago, oemBiology
you need to make a conscious effort, strong-willed to be willing to make this change.

Strong-will is required to change from knowing to believing.
It seems that emotion memory is the strong connection between neurons. Is there any trick making neurons easier to form different connections than those formerly established from biological viewpoints?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
  • New experiences shape your brain 
  • Consciously training your brain to think differently (this is why self-help books are so popular)

There isn't a hack to it, it really takes effort to be a calm, collected person. Also, genetics has a lot of influence on shaping your personality too. This is why it's hard for people to change as well, since you can't change your genes, but can condition yourself to be the way you want to be.
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wrote...
A month ago
When I feel sad, maybe some organ not function well, and stop hormone.
When I feel love, do some organ generate any kind of hormone as well?

Would those hormone generate memory within muscle for any kind of emotional feeling?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
Dopamine is the hormone responsible for controlling mental, emotional responses, and motor reactions. Essentially, it is the main neurotransmitter for experiencing happiness. When a nostalgic memory is recalled, depending on the memory itself, it could instill happy, fear, sadness, etc. The level of release for this hormone is likely proportional to that, and likely plays a role in decision-making, too. I'd say this is part of system 2, where emotions are used to dictate how a decision is made by the brain.
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wrote...
A month ago
Would those emotional memory stay within muscle / organs?  If people receive transplant organs, would received people feel donor's emotional memory as well?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
Would those emotional memory stay within muscle / organs?

Your brain would have to activate the muscles. Fine motor skills exhibited by your hands is coordinated by small muscles which involve the synchronisation of hands and fingers with the eyes. Motor neurons in your hands will innervate a small number of muscle fibers to activate movement with the direction ultimately originating from your brain. If people receive transplant organs, the recipient who's used to moving their hand a certain way will find limitations in their former ability. They'd have to retrain their muscles (through physiotherapy, for example). The donor's emotional memory resides in the donor's brain, not hand.
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wrote...
A month ago Edited: A month ago, oemBiology
emotional memory is stored on gut (feeling), not the brain, so emotional memory is kept on organs (emotion, fast) instead of brain (logic, slow). If people receive transplant organs, would recipient feel donor's emotional memory as well?
Do you find any related articles about this issue?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)

wrote...
Educator
A month ago
emotional memory is stored on gut (feeling), not the brain, so emotional memory is kept on organs (emotion, fast) instead of brain (logic, slow). If people receive transplant organs, would recipient feel donor's emotional memory as well?

The brain deals with emotions via the limbic system mostly. "Gut feeling" is a term used to describe your conscience; your conscience is based on your experiences and what you have gone through. That being said, I don't think that it's related to any organ in your gut, but interesting, >50% of serotonin (the feel-good neurotransmitter) is manufactured in your gut. AND, gut bacteria can influence mood and emotions (via the production of metabolites), highlighting their connection with the brain.
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wrote...
A month ago Edited: A month ago, oemBiology
I would like to know on how higher level (go to forest) and lower level (go to high mountain) of oxygen affect gut bacteria related to mood and emotions (via the production of metabolites),

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
Gut bacteria are obligate anaerobes, which means they die in the presense of oxygen. Thus, altitude has no affect on then as long as they're in the gut, where very little oxygen exists anyway.
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wrote...
Staff Member
A month ago
I would like to know on how higher level (go to forest) and lower level (go to high mountain) of oxygen affect gut bacteria related to mood and emotions (via the production of metabolites), Do you have any suggestions? Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)

I don't think it's a matter of metabolites, but there is a correlation between viewing nature scenes and good mood, and being exposed to nature affects mental well-being. That's discussed here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3699874/ Of course, there's a lot more to it than this, but here's a short excerpt which I think summarizes how it works. I don't want to get off topic with your thread, so it if this is some other avenue you want to discuss, feel free to start a new topic on it.

The ANS (autonomic nervous system) plays a central role in governing the response to stress and how the body recovers following a stressor. Indeed, Lane and Thayer utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the hypothesized heart–brain connection and found concurrent associations between vagal influenced HRV (heart rate variability) and changes in blood flow through areas of the brain known to be involved in emotional responses, attention, and working memory. Additionally, the prefrontal cortex has been observed to play a role in the top-down regulation of HRV, as demonstrated using direct current stimulation of the dorsolateral area of the prefrontal cortex during viewing of negative images compared to neutral images (images of nature were not used in this study). The relaxation and restorative effect of nature might help combat the rising incidence of psychological stress by providing a potential resilience tool. Previous analysis of the restorative effects of nature suggest that participants recover faster from induced stress (in terms of HR) when, during the recovery, they view nature through a window or view projected scenes of natural environments. HR recovery in the latter study was purported to occur due to, in part, an enhanced recovery of parasympathetic activity. It is, however, unknown whether the benefits of nature on cardiovascular reactivity continue to occur after exposure has ceased.
 

Good luck!
- Master of Science in Biology
- Bachelor of Science (Biology)
- Bachelor of Education
wrote...
A month ago
Continue discussion on following post :>

https://biology-forums.com/index.php?topic=1930159.msg4981301#msg4981301
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