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CarbonRobot CarbonRobot
wrote...
Posts: 240
Rep: 4 0
4 months ago
I was wondering what treatments are used depending on the type and stage of cancer? Is chemo therapy the go to for nearly everything? Or do they really push the treatments that don't cause further DNA damage first?
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wrote...
Staff Member
4 months ago
The major treatments currently available are surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and immunotherapy.

  • Surgery is the most effective and fastest treatment for tumors that are caught early and have not metastasized.
  • Therapeutic radiology, i.e. radiation therapy, uses high-energy particles or waves, such as X rays or gamma rays, to focus damaging radiation on the region of a tumor, inflicting genetic damage that kills cancerous cells.
  • Chemotherapy uses powerful anticancer drugs that travel through the bloodstream, making it potentially useful for cancers that have spread. Oncologists use about 50 different chemotherapeutic drugs to combat cancer, generally administering more than one drug at a time because these drugs are more powerful when combined.
  • Some types of cancer, such as breast and prostate cancer, depend on sex hormones to grow. Hormone therapy prevents cancer cells from receiving or using the hormones they need.
  • Immunotherapy, also called biologic therapy (procedure shown below), uses the body’s own immune system to fight cancer cells or protect the body from side effects. Immunotherapy relies on antibodies, naturally occurring proteins dedicated to defending the body against invasion by foreign substances.

- Master of Science in Biology
- Bachelor of Science (Biology)
- Bachelor of Education
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
4 months ago
Know of any cancer treatments that don't damage DNA or are surgical? Magnet field experiments being tested?

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/magnetic-helmet-tumor-093523598.html?guccounter=1
wrote...
Staff Member
3 months ago
I wish there were. You'd need to look at homeopathic solutions otherwise. Some treatments do in fact have the potency to treat cancer or symptoms related to the disease. Is that something you'd be interested in learning about?
- Master of Science in Biology
- Bachelor of Science (Biology)
- Bachelor of Education
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
3 months ago
If homeopathic options aren't practiced in cancer hospitals I don't have enough reason to believe they are that affective.
wrote...
A month ago
The major types of cancer are carcinoma, sarcoma, melanoma, lymphoma, and leukemia. Commonly diagnosed cancer originates in skin, lungs, breasts, pancreas and other organs and glands. Leukemia is cancer of the blood.

Treatment of Cancer are:
- Chemotherapy
- Surgery
- Radiation Therapy
- Targeted Therapy
- Hormone Therapy
- Stem Cell Therapy
- Immunotherapy
Posted by Semantha Lorez
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
A month ago
Yes, but if you took the 80% most common cancers a person will have in life, how many treatments do quite a lot of harm and promote more cancer down the road?
wrote...
Educator
A month ago Edited: A month ago, bio_man
If homeopathic options aren't practiced in cancer hospitals I don't have enough reason to believe they are that affective.

I believe the issue with modern day medicine is this belief of a one-size fits all approach to solving a medical problem. If doctors detect cancer, the first option is typically chemotherapy. The patient really has no other option because the medical community believes we all respond to the medicine in a similar way without doing any prior individual tests.

The COVID vaccine, for example, was administered to the entire population based on studies that consisted of <1000 participants. They immediately made conclusions thinking that everyone else would respond the same way. It only took a few months before people realized it didn't work as intended, and that many people suffered from its side effects, which weren't thoroughly reported or made available to the public. Many others found that using off-label medication was more effective than what the medical community promised would be the end-all cure for the disease.
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
A month ago
If homeopathic options aren't practiced in cancer hospitals I don't have enough reason to believe they are that affective.
I believe the issue with modern day medicine is this belief of a one-size fits all approach to solving a medical problem. If doctors detect cancer, the first option is typically chemotherapy. The patient really has no other option because the medical community believes we all respond to the medicine in a similar way without doing any prior individual tests. The COVID vaccine, for example, was administered to the entire population based on studies that consisted of <1000 participants. They immediately made conclusions thinking that everyone else would respond the same way. It only took a few months before people realized it didn't work as intended, and that many people suffered from its side effects, which weren't thoroughly reported or made available to the public. Many others found that using off-label medication was more effective than what the medical community promised would be the end-all cure for the disease.

Well you wouldn't suggest plant oils diluted 1000 times in water as a cure for cancer? I know someone who got a cancer at 29 and had to get chemo which she was told gives her a 40% chance of getting leukemia sometime in the future. That doesn't sound like a "do no harm" type of treatment.
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
I completely agree, chemotherapy is a literally poisonous. But when people are backed into a corner facing a life-or-death situation, and are promised a 60% chance of survival, they will often take their chances.

I have also read that the drug ivermectin has anticancer potential, even though it is rarely used to treat the disease.
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
A month ago
I completely agree, chemotherapy is a literally poisonous. But when people are backed into a corner facing a life-or-death situation, and are promised a 60% chance of survival, they will often take their chances. I have also read that the drug ivermectin has anticancer potential, even though it is rarely used to treat the disease.

I just hope gene therapy or some type of reprogramming can be used to help healthy cells detect and attack cancer like they should.
wrote...
Staff Member
A month ago


Reprogramming T cells to hunt down cancer cells sounds very promising, but it's also risky.

The therapy involves making four genetic modifications to T cells. First, the addition of a synthetic gene gives the T cells a claw-like protein (called a receptor) that enables it to sees NY-ESO-1, a molecule on some cancer cells. Then CRISPR is used to remove three genes: two that can interfere with the NY-ESO-1 receptor and another that limits the cells’ cancer-killing abilities.
- Master of Science in Biology
- Bachelor of Science (Biology)
- Bachelor of Education
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
A month ago
Reprogramming T cells to hunt down cancer cells sounds very promising, but it's also risky. The therapy involves making four genetic modifications to T cells. First, the addition of a synthetic gene gives the T cells a claw-like protein (called a receptor) that enables it to sees NY-ESO-1, a molecule on some cancer cells. Then CRISPR is used to remove three genes: two that can interfere with the NY-ESO-1 receptor and another that limits the cells’ cancer-killing abilities.



Like this?
wrote...
Staff Member
A month ago
Great vid! Thanks for sharing
- Master of Science in Biology
- Bachelor of Science (Biology)
- Bachelor of Education
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