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CarbonRobot CarbonRobot
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Posts: 280
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A week ago
How many medical doctors themselves use antidepressants? I think the number might be high for med students, but I am asking about practitioners.
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wrote...
Educator
A week ago
Doctors are no different than you or I. They may have a higher IQ on average (probably), but they are human beings with the same weaknesses as everyone else. Doctors, however, are much more aware of the side-effects of these drugs, but these drugs are much more accessible to them, so the temptation is real.

Many medical doctors that are recent graduates put their full faith in scientific studies generated by pharmaceutical companies regarding new drugs. For example, for the longest time, the scientific community, including doctors believed that depression was caused by low levels of serotonin, and thus a "hormone imbalance". I believe that idea was debunked earlier this year; that is, depression is not caused by an imbalance of hormones. As a result of this blind trust, they may take antidepressants when they're feeling low and suffer the same consequences as everyone else.

Usually the earliest adopters of new medications are doctors or family members of doctors. For example, in the 1950's, thalidomide was released to prevent morning sickness in pregnant women. Canadian doctors (which were all male at the time), read the early studies and were convinced it worked, so they had their wives try it. Of those doctors wives that did try it, most of their children were born maimed at the limbs (again, this "blind trust" in the pharmaceutical industry) -- read more on that here.

Furthermore, I'm not certain the validity of this article, but it states that 75% of med students are on antidepressants or stimulants.

Here’s what depressed doctors do (when nobody’s looking). Some drink alcohol, exercise obsessively, even steal psychiatric meds. Still more shocking—I discovered that 75% of med students (and new doctors) are now on psychiatric medications.
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
A week ago
Doctors are no different than you or I. They may have a higher IQ on average (probably), but they are human beings with the same weaknesses as everyone else. Doctors, however, are much more aware of the side-effects of these drugs, but these drugs are much more accessible to them, so the temptation is real.

Many medical doctors that are recent graduates put their full faith in scientific studies generated by pharmaceutical companies regarding new drugs. For example, for the longest time, the scientific community, including doctors believed that depression was caused by low levels of serotonin, and thus a "hormone imbalance". I believe that idea was debunked earlier this year; that is, depression is not caused by an imbalance of hormones. As a result of this blind trust, they may take antidepressants when they're feeling low and suffer the same consequences as everyone else.

Usually the earliest adopters of new medications are doctors or family members of doctors. For example, in the 1950's, thalidomide was released to prevent morning sickness in pregnant women. Canadian doctors (which were all male at the time), read the early studies and were convinced it worked, so they had their wives try it. Of those doctors wives that did try it, most of their children were born maimed at the limbs (again, this "blind trust" in the pharmaceutical industry) -- read more on that here.

Furthermore, I'm not certain the validity of this article, but it states that 75% of med students are on antidepressants or stimulants.

Here’s what depressed doctors do (when nobody’s looking). Some drink alcohol, exercise obsessively, even steal psychiatric meds. Still more shocking—I discovered that 75% of med students (and new doctors) are now on psychiatric medications.

I was looking for percent of doctors versus nondoctors. Not a rant. If not serotonin related what alternate conclusion did they find?
wrote...
Educator
A week ago
Quote
If not serotonin related what alternate conclusion did they find?

Here's an article:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/insight-therapy/202207/depression-is-not-caused-chemical-imbalance-in-the-brain

Similarly:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/what-causes-depression
CarbonRobot Author
wrote...
A week ago
I read the articles. They certainly don't offer alternatives to SSRIs. If anything the Harvard one says SSRIs might help promote neurogenesis in the hippocampus to treat depression after a few weeks. I am not aware of drugs that promote neurogenesis, are you? I am only aware that for the longest time we thought the brain was pretty static. And we know neurons don't proliferate as other cells can. So again. Curious if doctors that prescribe use SSRIs (and other types of antidepressants) as often as those that get prescribed from doctors.
wrote...
Educator
A week ago
Quote
Curious if doctors that prescribe use SSRIs (and other types of antidepressants) as often as those that get prescribed from doctors.

It's very likely that this question has never been explored, since none of my journal searches lead to anything close. In fact, the closest I got to getting an answer was from this website, but it's not verifiable.

https://www.idealmedicalcare.org/75-med-students-antidepressants-stimulants
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