Top Posters
Since Sunday
27
c
9
s
6
j
5
5
s
5
5
m
5
5
b
4
p
4
m
4
New Topic  
Earthy Earthy
wrote...
Posts: 1022
7 years ago
Imagine you are sailing a yacht across the Caribbean. You have to sail through a shallow lagoon in order to reach port at an island ahead of you. It is night time, and you look up to observe a "quarter moon," such as the one pictured here.

You know that the lagoon is only safely navigable at high tide during the spring tide. Should you keep going tonight, or should you wait for a better time? (If so, when?)
Textbook 

Foundations of Earth Science


Edition: 7th
Authors:
Read 691 times
12 Replies
Replies
Answer verified by a subject expert
Richy271Richy271
wrote...
Top Poster
Posts: 2375
7 years ago
Sign in or Sign up in seconds to unlock everything for free
More solutions for this book are available here
 The quarter moon occurs when the Moon and the Sun act on Earth at right angles. We view the Moon from the side as the Sun shines on it. The quarter moons are an indication that while the gravity of the Moon is pulling the tides in one direction, the Sun is counteracting that in part, by pulling in a direction 90° to that. Hence, this quarter moon is an indication of the neap tides, a time of lesser tidal variation. It will be two weeks until the spring tide, so the lagoon cannot be safely crossed for a fortnight. We should toss the anchor overboard and wait it out.
 
This verified answer contains over 110 words.
rosalilly,  Connor Gerren,  Jordan Tschiegg

Related Topics

Earthy Author
wrote...
7 years ago
I'll mark my thread solved, I appreciate the help!
wrote...
7 years ago
Pretty simple question if you think about it. Thanks for providing feedback.
wrote...
2 years ago
Thank you
wrote...
2 years ago
thank you
wrote...
2 months ago
Thank you
wrote...
2 months ago
Thx
wrote...
2 months ago
Thanks
wrote...
2 months ago
TY :)
wrote...
A month ago
Thanks!
wrote...
A month ago
Thx
wrote...
A month ago
Thanks!
New Topic      
Explore
Post your homework questions and get free online help from our incredible volunteers
  183 People Browsing
 335 Signed Up Today
Related Images
  
 892
  
 118
  
 87