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3 years ago Edited: 3 years ago, meowmeowmely
Can someone please help me with this question? I would really appreciate it.

The HCP writes a prescription for an insulin drip to begin for Mr. Rogers, who currently weighs 226 is (97.9 kg). The pharmacy sends a pre-mixed insulin drip with 100 units of regular insulin in 100 cc of 0.9% Normal Saline. Per hospital protocol, the blood glucose is monitored hourly for titration of insulin infusion.


The RN sets the insulin drip to delivery how many mL/hr?


Post Merge: 3 years ago

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wrote...
Staff Member
3 years ago
Your initial rate is usually weight based and then titrated according the blood glucose.

The rate is easily determined because the concentration is one unit per ml.
Ask another question, I may be able to help!
wrote...
2 months ago Edited: 2 months ago, Joyous
The HCP writes a prescription for an insulin drip to begin for Mr. Rogers, who currently weighs 226 is (97.9 kg). The pharmacy sends a pre-mixed insulin drip with 100 units of regular insulin in 100 cc of 0.9% Normal Saline. Per hospital protocol, the blood glucose is monitored hourly for titration of insulin infusion.


The RN sets the insulin drip to delivery how many mL/hr?
Post Merge: 2 months ago

The HCP writes a prescription for an insulin drip to begin for Mr. Rogers, who currently weighs 226 is (97.9 kg). The pharmacy sends a pre-mixed insulin drip with 100 units of regular insulin in 100 cc of 0.9% Normal Saline.


The RN sets the insulin drip to deliver how many mL/hr?
wrote...
Staff Member
Educator
2 months ago
Ok, so here's what I think. I'm not a nurse by the way!

We're told 100 cc, which means 100 cubic centimeters. The conversation ration between cubic centimeters and milliliters is 1 to 1. Therefore, 100 mL equals 100 cc.

Furthermore, We're told 100 units, this part I'm confused about. I found online that 1 unit = 0.01 mL. Therefore:

\(100\ units\times \frac{0.01\ mL}{1\ unit}=1\ mL\)

The 0.9% converted to a decimal is 0.09. I'm not sure if we multiply this to 100 mL or what.

If so, 0.09 * 100 mL = 9 mL per hour ? I'm stuck Face Screaming in Fear

Could someone else please chime in, where are all the nurses at?

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