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nichania nichania
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Posts: 994
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4 years ago
Explain the concept of the drive-reduction theory. Be sure to include information about a need, drive, primary drives, secondary (acquired) drives, and homeostasis.
Textbook 

Psychology


Edition: 2nd
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Psychology, 2nd Edition (Minter, Elmhorst, Ciccarelli, White)

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Staff Member
A month ago
Drive reduction theory of motivation can be simply described as you don't want to be hungry, thirsty, in pain, or horny. If your body wants something, that want is the drive. You are motivated to reduce the drive.


Drive reduction theory was first established by Clark Hull. Hull was interested in applying mathematical formulas to psychology, and it is simple to see how this works with the drive reduction theory.

If you have achieved homeostasis, your motivation is zero, since you have no drives to reduce. If you are hungry, then your drive is increased to one. If you are really hungry, your drive becomes two. If you are thirsty, your drive to satisfy the hunger and thirst becomes three. As drives accumulate, your overall motivation increases.

Primary vs. Secondary Drives
You may have noticed that human behaviors go far beyond getting food, water, and sex, and being comfortable. If you are reading this right now, you are literally not obtaining any of those. But you are working towards them by way of a secondary drive.

Primary drives are biological needs that provide you motivation. If you are hungry, you look for food. If you are thirsty, you look for water. These drives keep you alive.
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