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wrote...
Educator
2 months ago Edited: 2 months ago, bio_man
Quote
Do you find any related articles on how gravitational pull of the moon effects on atmospheric pressure?

Nothing from any journal, unfortunately. I found an ordinary article suggesting the following:

Quote
When the moon is overhead, its gravity causes Earth’s atmosphere to bulge toward it, so the pressure or weight of the atmosphere on that side of the planet goes up. Higher pressure increases the temperature of air parcels below. Since warmer air can hold more moisture, the same air parcels are now farther from their moisture capacity.

https://www.washington.edu/news/2016/01/29/phases-of-the-moon-affect-amount-of-rainfall
oemBiology Author
wrote...
2 months ago Edited: 2 months ago, oemBiology
“When the moon is overhead or underfoot, the air pressure is higher,” Kohyama said.
Where did Kohyama mention about higher air pressure? on the ground or up into air or both
Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)

Post Merge: 2 months ago

Referring to article's summary, "The release of neurohormones may be triggered by the electromagnetic radiation and/or the gravitational pull of the moon."

I would like to know on how the electromagnetic radiation trigger to release more neurohormones within body, is there any related articles talking about this issue?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
wrote...
Educator
2 months ago
“When the moon is overhead or underfoot, the air pressure is higher,” Kohyama said. Where did Kohyama mention about higher air pressure? on the ground or up into air or both Do you have any suggestions?

Assuming @ ground level.

Quote
I would like to know on how the electromagnetic radiation trigger to release more neurohormones within body, is there any related articles talking about this issue?

It was concluded that even a single 45 min of Long term exposure to low level electromagnetic radiation exposure may produce an increase in 5-HT level without changing the blood glutamate level. Increased 5-HT level may lead to a retarded learning and a deficit in spatial memory (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 24).

-- https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25665475/

A mechanism of how ER contributes to neurotransmitter release is illustrated below in another article: [see attachment]

The effects of RF-EMR exposure on neurotransmitters in the brain and the possible underlying mechanisms.

-- https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2021.691880/full#B8
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oemBiology Author
wrote...
2 months ago Edited: 2 months ago, oemBiology
EMR exposure may reduce Dopamine (DA) production in the hippocampus, affect rat arousal, and contribute to decreased learning and memory ability after exposure to EMR

long-term exposure to microwave radiation can lead to an increase in serotonin (5-HT) in the brain, indicating a disorder in the metabolism of the neurotransmitter.

serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is massively synthesized in the gastrointestinal tract (mainly in enterochromafin cells), whereas only a small percentage is produced within the nervous system.

To synthesize serotonin,
1) amino acid tryptophan is converted to 5-HTP
2) 5-HTP is converted to serotonin (5-HT)
3) serotonin affects the rest of the central nervous system

Through above process, how is serotonin linked to mood?

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)


Serotonin, Dopamine and your Brain

Post Merge: 2 months ago

Serotonin is associated with feelings of happiness, focus and calm,
Dopamine is associated with feelings of rewards, motivation, and being productive.

Results: The exposure to EMR resulted in significant changes in DA, NE and 5-HT in the four selected areas of adult rat brain.
Conclusions: The exposure of adult rats to EMR may cause disturbances in monoamine neurotransmitters and this may underlie many of the adverse effects reported after EMR including memory, learning, and stress.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23852905/
Post Merge: 2 months ago

EMR exposure may reduce Dopamine (DA) production in the hippocampus

I would like to confirm on whether EMR exposure may reduce serotonin or not.

Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)

Post Merge: 2 months ago

"further studies are necessary to illuminate the role of 5-HT in EMR-induced learning and memory dysfunction and morphological changes in the brain." p.5

Our brain learns by forming new neural pathways, alter existing connections, and adapt and react in ever-changing ways.
1) is there any role for 5-HT play here for building new neural pathway activity?
2) would EMR cause disturbances in monoamine neurotransmitters? which make forming new neural pathway activity impossible?

Do you find any related articles about this issue?
Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)


Post Merge: 2 months ago

Rewards support the brain’s learning process
I would like to know on which following case come first related to DA and 5-HT.

1) After forming a new neural pathway, DA or 5-HT release to make us feel good
2) No matter what DA or 5-HT release not related to form a new neural pathway at all

wrote...
Educator
2 months ago
Serotonin has many functions. It is released from blood cells called platelets to activate blood vessel constriction and blood clotting. In the gastrointestinal tract, serotonin inhibits gastric acid production and stimulates muscle contraction in the intestinal wall. And, as you've said, its functions in the central nervous system and effects on human behavior - including mood, memory, and appetite control.

Serotonin is produced in the brain from the amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan is transported to the brain, where it is broken down by enzymes to produce serotonin. In the process of neurotransmission, serotonin is transferred from one nerve cell, or neuron, to another, triggering an electrical impulse that stimulates or inhibits cell activity as needed. Serotonin is then reabsorbed by the first neuron, in a process known as reuptake, where it is recycled and used again or converted into an inactive chemical form and excreted. As mentioned, serotonin contribute to feelings of euphoria, thus making you feel happy and confident - not sure the exact mechanism (will need to look into it further).

Drugs that manipulate serotonin levels have been used to alleviate the symptoms of serotonin imbalances. Some of these drugs, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), block or inhibit the reuptake of serotonin into neurons, enabling serotonin to remain active in the synapses for a longer period of time.

oemBiology Author
wrote...
2 months ago
Referring to following statement, I would like to know on why rodents produced FAR MORE melatonin at night with sun exposure during daytime.


Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)


"The rodents that were given sun exposure produced FAR MORE melatonin at night than the ones in the artificially-lit room."

https://lifespa.com/ayurvedic-lifestyle/circadian-rhythm/sun-exposure-melatonin/
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
Rodents are nocturnal animals, so I'd assume it would have something to do with their feeding pattern - I don't know for certain. The hormone plays a role in the body's circadian rhythm. This rhythm regulates the physiological functions that occur in the organism within a 24-hour period, such as sleep-wake cycles, fluctuations in body temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure.

In animals it is clear that conveying information about day, night, or time of year is critical for mating and reproduction so that offspring are born at the best time of year, usually in the milder spring rather than the harsher winter. It is less clear how this role may affect humans. Some studies suggest that melatonin helps regulate sleep-wake cycles and is an effective treatment for some forms of insomnia, jet lag, or shift work.
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