× Didn't find what you were looking for? Ask a question
  
  
  
  
Top Posters
Since Sunday
14
8
8
7
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
New Topic  
wrote...
Posts: 120
Rep: 6 0
A month ago Edited: A month ago, prashantakerkar

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorine

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/well/is-chlorine-in-swimming-pools-safe.html

1 Are there elements in the Periodic table which can substitute Chlorine in the Swimming pools?

2 Can Chlorine be added in Oceans, Seas, Lakes ?

If yes, Upto How much amount?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar


Post Merge: A month ago


Thanks.

https://www.quora.com/Can-fish-survive-in-a-chlorinated-swimming-pool

Is this could be the reason?

Even Small amounts of Chlorine can be harmful to Fishes & other animals living in Oceans, Seas, Rivers & Lakes?

Interestingly Large Fishes Sharks, Whales, Dolphins etc  can survive small amount of chlorinated water but not small fishes in Oceans, Seas, Lakes & Rivers ?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar
Post Merge: A month ago


Thanks.

Interestingly, Flourine, Iodine and other periodic table elements may be not as Harmful as Chlorine in Oceans, Seas, Rivers, Lakes & Swimming pools to Fishes & Human Beings?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar
Attached file
Thumbnail(s):
You must login or register to gain access to this attachment.
Read 74 times
1 Reply
Related Topics
Replies
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
They're called interhalogen compounds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interhalogen

According to the article, ..

.. an interhalogen compound is a molecule which contains two or more different halogen atoms (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, or astatine) and no atoms of elements from any other group.

Most interhalogen compounds known are binary (composed of only two distinct elements). Their formulae are generally XYn, where n = 1, 3, 5 or 7, and X is the less electronegative of the two halogens. They are all prone to hydrolysis, and ionize to give rise to polyhalogen ions.

Example: Chlorine monofluoride (ClF) is the lightest interhalogen compound. ClF is a colorless gas with a normal boiling point of −100 °C.

If high concentrations of chlorine were added to the ocean, it'd literally destroy every living thing it makes contact with. Of course, the concentration would have to be high enough given that it's already found naturally in drinking water. Here's a toxicology report on chlorine, it mentions what concentration is safe and what isn't (attached).

Hope this helps answer your question!
Attached file
(4639.56 KB)
You must login or register to gain access to this attachment.
The best way to say thank you is with a positive review:

  https://trustpilot.com/review/biology-forums.com 

Your support goes a long way!


Make a note request here
New Topic      
Explore
Post your homework questions and get free online help from our incredible volunteers.
Learn More
Improve Grades
Help Others
Save Time
Accessible 24/7
  420 People Browsing
Related Images
 561
 499
 36

▶️ Video: Bone Healing Animation

For a complete list of videos, visit our video library