Top Posters
Since Sunday
6
l
6
n
5
N
5
m
5
s
4
4
4
r
4
m
4
4
s
4
New Topic  
prashantakerkar prashantakerkar
wrote...
Valued Member
Posts: 446
A month ago

https://www.technologyuk.net/science/measurement-and-units/physical-quantities-and-si-units.shtml

Could it be useful to add a new column in the table to classify the physical quantity as Scalar or Vector?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar
Read 176 times
4 Replies
Replies
wrote...
Educator
A month ago
Could it be useful to add a new column in the table to classify the physical quantity as Scalar or Vector?

I don't think that's necessary. As a scientist using these units, you should be able to tell which is which, what do you say?
The best way to say thank you is with a positive review:

  Click here to review us!
wrote...
Staff Member
A month ago
Here's a list of 20 different vector quantities. All of these are made up of different SSI units, so it's not a practical to make note of them all. What you have to do is recall that a vector quantity consists of a direction, so if your unit includes a direction, you know where it stands.

1) Displacement
2) Velocity
3) Acceleration
4) Force
5) Torque
6) Electric field
7) Magnetic field
8) Angular velocity
9) Linear Momentum
10) Dipole moment
11) Vector potential
12) Angular momentum
13) Weight
14) Current density
15) Thrust
16) Magnetic dipole moment
17) Magnetisation
18) Polarization
19) Electric Displacement
20) Poynting Vector.
- Master of Science in Biology
- Bachelor of Science (Biology)
- Bachelor of Education
wrote...
Valued Member
A month ago Edited: A month ago, prashantakerkar
Thank you.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centimetre%E2%80%93gram%E2%80%93second_system_of_units

Do you feel it is useful to add CGS units for the above physical quantities ?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar
Answer accepted by topic starter
bio_manbio_man
wrote...
Educator
Top Poster
Posts: 25303
A month ago
Sign in or Sign up in seconds to unlock everything for free.
The CGS system (also known as the Gaussian system or the electrostatic system) was replaced more than 100 years ago. The metre and kilogram system now serves as the basis for the development of the International System of Units (abbreviated SI), which now serves as the international standard. In many fields of science and engineering, SI is the only system of units in use but there remain certain subfields where CGS is prevalent.

That's not to say that aren't similarities between MKS and CGS. In measurements of purely mechanical systems (involving units of length, mass, force, energy, pressure, and so on), the differences between CGS and SI are straightforward and trivial; the unit-conversion factors are all powers of 10 as 100 cm = 1 m and 1000 g = 1 kg. Therefore, we could use it over SI, but what's the point?

See how they compare in the table below. Notice that they can all be converted from one form to the other.
This verified answer contains over 180 words and 2 attached file(s).
Attached file(s)
Thumbnail(s):
Other attached file(s):
(245.11 KB)
You must login or register to gain access to these attachments.
1
The best way to say thank you is with a positive review:

  Click here to review us!

Related Topics

New Topic      
Explore
Post your homework questions and get free online help from our incredible volunteers.
Learn More
Improve Grades
Help Others
Save Time
Accessible 24/7
  114 People Browsing
 150 Signed Up Today
Your Opinion
Which 'study break' activity do you find most distracting?
Votes: 167

Related Images
 1048
 68
 88