Top Posters
Since Sunday
25
10
9
6
w
3
M
3
C
2
l
2
2
s
2
2
New Topic  
sportylatina sportylatina
wrote...
Posts: 90
Rep: 0 0
A month ago
Describe the five stages of deciding to help in an emergency, and discuss reasons why helping might be blocked at each stage. Apply each stage to a situation in which something unusual is happening on a city bus.
Textbook 

Psychology


Edition: 1st
Authors:
Read 7 times
1 Reply
Replies
Answer verified by a subject expert
arrarwearwearrarwearwe
wrote...
Posts: 70
Rep: 0 0
A month ago
Sign in or Sign up in seconds to unlock everything for free
More questions for this book are available here
Answers will vary, but should contain the following for full credit:
John Darley and Bibb Latané proposed five stages that people go through when deciding to offer assistance during an emergency. The first stage is to simply notice the event. If a potential helper is distracted, in a hurry, or doesn't see that an unusual situation is occurring, this stage would be thwarted. The second stage is to interpret the event as an emergency. A person might see that something is going on, yet not interpret it as a situation requiring some kind of intervention. If others don't look worried or no one else is taking action, the potential helper's efforts would again end there. The third stage is to assume responsibility for acting. The person has noticed the event and interpreted it as an emergency, but if she or he doesn't feel any responsibility for acting (often through diffusion of responsibility), no help is offered. The fourth stage involves knowing what the appropriate form of assistance would be. Progressing through stages 1, 2, and 3 is great; but if the potential helper doesn't know what to do to remediate the problem, no help is rendered. The fifth and final stage is to implement the decision to help. Thinking to oneself, "Wow, this sure looks like an emergency, and I know what to do to help . . . but I won't" does no good.
(Bus examples will vary, but they should clearly illustrate the five stages.)
As an example of these stages, let's say you ride the same city bus to school each morning. One morning you notice an elderly rider you've seen many times before slump over in her seat. You notice the situation, because most other people aren't slumping in their seats. You interpret it as an emergency, because the person is usually talkative, you've heard a slight groan, and you see that other riders look alarmed. Sitting only one row behind the woman, you assume responsibility for acting; the person sitting all the way in the back of the bus isn't leaping up to help. Because you took a class in CPR you know the basics of what to do if artificial respiration, chest compressions, or other basic aid is needed. You jump from your seat and take action, ultimately saving the person's life.

This verified answer contains over 380 words.
1

Related Topics

wrote...
Posts: 90
Credits: 40

A month ago
This calls for a celebration Person Raising Both Hands in Celebration
wrote...
Posts: 141
Credits: 175

Yesterday
Thank you, thank you, thank you!
wrote...
Posts: 63
Credits: 40

2 hours ago
This helped my grade so much Perfect
New Topic      
Explore
Post your homework questions and get free online help from our incredible volunteers
  335 People Browsing
 740 Signed Up Today
Your Opinion
What percentage of nature vs. nurture dictates human intelligence?
Votes: 198

Previous poll results: Do you believe in global warming?
Related Images
 1552
 122