× Didn't find what you were looking for? Ask a question
  
  
Top Posters
Since Sunday
21
A
8
7
w
6
R
5
o
5
A
5
t
5
m
5
t
5
h
5
S
5
New Topic  
CarbonRobot CarbonRobot
wrote...
Posts: 161
Rep: 2 0
5 months ago
What are the risks of removing bone spurs from ones cervical spine? I have had them for a few months in a noticeable capacity and I have been dizzy and sprain my neck nearly weekly now. But since I haven't lost control of my bladder or extremities I get the feeling they would never bother doing it on me. I feel so swollen all the time and worry I'll get into a car accident. I wish MRIs were no brainers if they weren't so expensive. What options does a person have?
Read 434 times
9 Replies

Related Topics

Replies
wrote...
Educator
5 months ago
Quote
But since I haven't lost control of my bladder or extremities I get the feeling they would never bother doing it on me.

Operating on the neck is risky, because there's always a possibility of nerve or spinal cord damage. Therefore, most surgeons will recommend against it unless it is absolutely necessary; for example, a person experiences a neck injury due to a car accident. Have you tried any alternatives to manage your pain and discomfort? If so, were they effect? Which one, if any helped you the most?

A list of non-surgical treatments are provided here: https://www.spine-health.com/conditions/arthritis/treatment-options-bone-spurs
wrote...
5 months ago
I was in PT for 5 months. Started to help at beginning but felt like it made things worse in the last 2 months. Felt like it was forcing too much motion and possibly making bigger spurs. The only other things are hot, cold, or Nsaids. Hot half the time helps a little. Cold used to help more and sometimes I just use to numb any feeling. Nsaids usually help the most but I can't use that daily, and generally the next day I feel even worst and seem more prone to injury.
wrote...
Educator
5 months ago
Nsaids usually help the most but I can't use that daily, and generally the next day I feel even worst and seem more prone to injury.

Yes, because they're only masking the pain, and when it wears-off, you feel the aftermath.

It sounds to me like these options aren't working, and you're fed up and want to return back to normal.

Have you spoken to your doctor about injecting that area with some kind of steroid shot (e.g epidural corticosteroid)? From people that I've spoken to, this is a lot more effective in bringing down swelling and reducing the pain, than are NSAIDs. Perhaps you could try that before deciding on a surgical option.
wrote...
5 months ago
Nsaids usually help the most but I can't use that daily, and generally the next day I feel even worst and seem more prone to injury.
Yes, because they're only masking the pain, and when it wears-off, you feel the aftermath. It sounds to me like these options aren't working, and you're fed up and want to return back to normal. Have you spoken to your doctor about injecting that area with some kind of steroid shot (e.g epidural corticosteroid)? From people that I've spoken to, this is a lot more effective in bringing down swelling and reducing the pain, than are NSAIDs. Perhaps you could try that before deciding on a surgical option.

I would like to know the most advanced procedures available. I think I read something about using soundwaves to remove bone. Someone must of invented something far less risky. Which is why I'd like to find the lasted research on this type of procedures.
wrote...
Educator
5 months ago
I think I read something about using soundwaves to remove bone.

I've heard of that being used to dissolve kidney stones, but never for bone spurs in the neck. I can't imagine that technology working in this case; that area is simply too delicate to risk it with shockwave therapy. We've covered most of the non-surgical options: rest, physiotherapy, medications, and injection therapy.
wrote...
5 months ago
"Note:  You've nearly used up all your posting credits (only 6 left). You need at least 3 CREDITS to start a new topic. You can earn credits by answering questions, adding images to the gallery, or by purchasing a credit pack."

What's this? This is a pay forum? I see so many ads so I would hope not?
wrote...
Educator
5 months ago
We've used a "freemium" model for the longest time; essentially it's there to encourage members to contribute their own knowledge by answering questions posted by other members. Every answer/post/comment earns you 1 credit, and every new topic/question posted costs you 2 credits.

Since you're not a student, most of your questions aren't homework-related; in that case, you really should be starting topics in the News Articles & Discussion board, which is "free" to post topics, that is, you don't waste any credits.

Quote
I see so many ads so I would hope not?

I believe the ads disappear when a premium membership is purchased. But moving forward, remember to start topics like these in the News and Discussion board to avoid this credit problem Grinning Face with Smiling Eyes
wrote...
5 months ago
Yeah, I can't speak with authority on most biology topics so I don't feel I should try to answer too many questions.
wrote...
4 months ago
Infection in the wound or vertebral bones is two risks of spine surgery. Damage to a spinal nerve, resulting in weakness, discomfort, or numbness. After surgery, there is partial or no pain alleviation. If it is confirmed that spinal bone spurs are the likely source of back pain and other symptoms, a variety of therapeutic methods are available.
The majority of individuals with mild to moderate nerve compression and irritation caused by bone spurs may adequately manage their symptoms without surgery. Nonsurgical therapy aims to break the cycle of pain and inflammation.
The following are examples of nonsurgical treatments:
Medication
A short period of rest. Inflammation in the joints can be aggravated by physical activity. Resting for a short length of time allows inflammation to subside.
Physical therapy and exercise
Spinal manipulation: A spinal adjustment may help ease symptoms if the pain and inflammation produced by bone spurs are due to incorrect alignment and movement patterns in the spine.
Weight loss: Losing weight relieves strain on the spine, reducing friction between the facet joints of the vertebrae and lowering the risk of discomfort. Getting to a healthy weight is especially beneficial for relieving strain on the lower back.
Injections: Although a spinal injection may not totally alleviate a patient's discomfort, it may offer enough relief to allow rehabilitation to proceed. Injecting more than three times into the same joint in a short period of time is not recommended. Furthermore, if the initial injection does not offer relief, there is little indication that further injections into the same structure can improve the outcome.
New Topic      
Explore
Post your homework questions and get free online help from our incredible volunteers
  93 People Browsing
 223 Signed Up Today
Related Images
 5367
 554
 75
Your Opinion
Who's your favorite biologist?
Votes: 242