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anna_lee anna_lee
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4 months ago
I have a assignment. It is illustrated like this,

There is a cell that has a localized intracellular enzyme. It divides into two distinct characteristic daughter cells. However, there is only one of the daughter cells gets the enzyme product so when the enzyme product is depleted from the mother or the daughter cell, it will be difficult to distinguish between the daughter cells. If we try to knockdown of this enzyme, it will give the result in the loss of the difference between the two cell daughters.

Question: Is it safe to make a statement that the localization of this enzyme is the one and only factor that creates the difference between the two cell daughters? If not, explain why?
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wrote...
Educator
4 months ago
Question: Is it safe to make a statement that the localization of this enzyme is the one and only factor that creates the difference between the two cell daughters? If not, explain why?

Great question! One daughter cell gets the enzyme while the other doesn't, and when it depletes, there's no other distinguishing feature.

You can say that localization of this enzyme is a distinguishing feature, but also add that if the enzyme is getting depleted, then it is doing something. If it is doing something, then maybe a  chemical is being created or converted that you'd find in one group and not the other.
wrote...
4 months ago
Hi sir @bio_man
Thank you for answering. Could you please give me an example? I think it will be easier for me to understand your points
wrote...
Educator
4 months ago Edited: 4 months ago, bio_man
An enzyme's job is to perform a task, whether it be through hydrolysis, condensation, etc. When it performs its task, it either creates a new molecule by combining two or more different molecules, or it breaks down a molecule into two or more parts.

What I'm suggesting is that you can differentiate the two daughter cells by examining the chemical composition to see if there are any molecular differences within the cytoplasm.

If the enzyme is getting depleted, that suggests work has been done, and this would be a viable way to determine that.
wrote...
3 months ago
 do you have any recommendation of technical methods to examine the chemical composition to see if there are any molecular differences within the cytoplasm?
wrote...
Educator
3 months ago Edited: 3 months ago, bio_man
That's not how it works. The chemical composition depends on the known function of the enzyme. For example, if the function of the enzymes is the hydrolysis of starch into glucose molecules, you'd use an assay that determines levels of free-glucose in the two groups for comparison sake.

If you don't have this starting point, then scientists use gas chromatography to determine differences in chemical composition.
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