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riptor riptor
wrote...
Posts: 5692
8 years ago
Southerners often argued that Southern slavery was a kindly, paternalistic system.  Does the internal slave trade and the nature of life for slaves in the Old Southwest support this contention?  Explain.
Textbook 
Out of Many: A History of the American People

Out of Many: A History of the American People


Edition: 5th
Authors:
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- 1st year history major
-- "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work"

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Staff Member
2 months ago
The idea that Southern slavery was a “kindly, paternalistic system” is a myth that was propagated by slave owners and their apologists. In reality, life for enslaved people in the Old Southwest was characterized by brutality, exploitation, and violence. Enslaved people were forced to work long hours in harsh conditions, often performing backbreaking labor on plantations or in mines. They were subject to physical and sexual abuse, and their families were often torn apart by the slave trade.

The internal slave trade, which developed after the international slave trade was abolished, further reinforced the brutal nature of slavery in the South. Enslaved people were forcibly separated from their families and sold to new owners in different parts of the country. This led to the loss of cultural and familial ties and contributed to a sense of isolation and despair among enslaved people.

In short, the idea that Southern slavery was a “kindly, paternalistic system” is a myth that ignores the brutal realities of slavery in the Old Southwest. Enslaved people were treated as property and were subject to the same economic pressures as any other form of property. They were denied basic rights and freedoms, and their lives were characterized by violence, exploitation, and oppression.

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions.

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