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maryam89 maryam89
wrote...
8 years ago
 If a mutation appears in one individual that changes one base in a DNA sequence to another base, and the population is evolving by genetic drift, over time that mutation will:
 Always take over and displace the old sequence. Disappear half the time and completely displace the old sequence half the time. Disappear most of the time. Always disappear.
Q2. When a DNA sequence is mutated, the individuals with that mutated sequence must also:
 Have corresponding changes in some trait like size or color. Be in a different population from the individuals with the older sequence. All have the same mutation at the same time. A mutation in a DNA sequence doesn't imply anything else about that individual.
Q3. To determine how related two wolves are using DNA sequences, you would look for a sequence that:
 Has very little or no selection on any position in the sequence. Has certain positions in the sequence that are under selection. Is under strong selection, so some mutations lead to better survival than others. Is directly related to a trait like size or color that you can see.
Q4. Using the method from this lab, what would be the genetic distance between Dog 1 and Dog 2 based on the following DNA sequences taken from the same place in each dog's DNA?
Dog 1: GGGGCCCC
Dog 2: GGGAACCC
 
Q5. If you measured the average size of individuals in many dog and wolf populations around the world, how would you use this to determine where and when dogs were domesticated from wolves?
 You would use the UPGMA or similar technique with the size differences between dogs in the different populations. You would rank the dog populations from smallest to largest to give relatedness. You could not determine the relationships among dog populations using size because size changes quickly based on the environment around each population. You could not determine the relationships among dog populations using size because you can only determine population relationships using DNA sequences.
Q6. What pattern of relatedness would you infer among four individuals based only on the following sequences from the same place in their chromosomes?
D1: AAAATTTT
D2: AAACTTTT
D3: ACCCTTTT
D4: CCCCGGTT
 D1 and D2 are most closely related. D1/D2 are in turn most closely related to D3, and D4 is the least related to the others. D1 and D2 are closely related. D3 and D4 are also closely related. D1/D2 are more distantly related to D3/D4. D1 and D3 are most closely related. D1/D2 are in turn most closely related to D2, and D4 is the least related to the others. D1 and D3 are closely related. D2 and D4 are closely related. D1/D3 are more distantly related to D2/D4.
Q7. What pattern of relatedness would you infer between the following individuals based just on these sequences?
D5: AAAATTTT
D6: AAACTTTT
D7: AGGCTTTC
D8: AGGGTTTT
 D5 and D6 are most closely related. D5/D6 are in turn most closely related to D7, and D8 is the least related to the others. D5 and D6 are closely related. D7 and D8 are also closely related. D5/D6 are more distantly related to D7/D8. D5 and D7 are most closely related. D5/D7 are in turn most closely related to D6, and D8 is the least related to the others. D5 and D7 are closely related. D6 and D8 are closely related. D5/D7 are more distantly related to D6/D8.
Q10. From the evolutionary tree for dogs and wolves in the lab workbook (Exercise 6: Wolves and Dogs), how many times do you infer that dogs were domesticated from wolves?
 None; dogs were domesticated from coyotes Once More than once
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Answer accepted by topic starter
LannnacailliLannnacailli
wrote...
Posts: 1
8 years ago Edited: 6 years ago, bio_man
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Hi Maryam89, I have the same exact assignment due tomorrow below are the answers I'm going with so far but I am not sure how accurate they are. If you already have the correct answers please let me know I would really appreciate the help.

1- disappear most of the time
2- be in a different pop
3- has very little or no selection

**
Q3. To determine how related two wolves are using DNA sequences, you would look for a sequence that:
 Has very little or no selection on any position in the sequence. Has certain positions in the sequence that are under selection. Is under strong selection, so some mutations lead to better survival than others. Is directly related to a trait like size or color that you can see.

Is under strong selection, so some mutations lead to better survival than others - This would be the part of the DNA that would differ the most between individuals in a population since these are the genes that are being selected for or against. If two individuals possess identical sequences in areas that are more strongly selected for then they are more related than individuals that differ in DNA in this region. Looking for DNA that is not under selective pressure (like introns) would not really tell much because it will most likely be the same even in individuals that are not that related to each other.

4- "2"
5- use UPGMA or third answer?

**You could not determine the relationships among dog populations using size because size changes quickly based on the environment around each population.

6- D1 and D2 most related and D4 least related
7- D5 and D6 most related but more distantly related to D7/D8
8- all but lower left quadrant
9- 1
10- more than once or once?

Sincerely,

Laura Smith
This verified answer contains over 350 words.
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Related Topics

wrote...
8 years ago
I came up with the same answers. though for #10 I put "once"
Purepower,  Evelyn Tran,  Diana Ramirez,  Vanessa B,  rigeldx98
wrote...
7 years ago
 Grinning Face, awesome thanks!
Purepower
wrote...
7 years ago
How did you get the answer to D?
Purepower
wrote...
Staff Member
7 years ago
How did you get the answer to D?

Which question?
Purepower,  juliacolbert01
- Master of Science in Biology
- Bachelor of Science (Biology)
- Bachelor of Education
wrote...
6 years ago
I have a few different answers than the ones posted, would anyone be able to collaberate with me on why they got certain answers, specifically the last one? Please feel free to message me.  I also have a question about how they came to find number 3 as I have a different answer and I was certain it was correct.  Face with Cold Sweat
wrote...
Educator
6 years ago
I have a few different answers than the ones posted, would anyone be able to collaberate with me on why they got certain answers, specifically the last one? Please feel free to message me.  I also have a question about how they came to find number 3 as I have a different answer and I was certain it was correct.  Face with Cold Sweat

I updated #5
wrote...
Educator
6 years ago
I updated #3 as well... Let me know which other one you need help with
wrote...
2 years ago
thank you
wrote...
2 years ago
thank you
wrote...
2 years ago
thank you
wrote...
2 years ago
thank you!
wrote...
2 years ago
Thank you!
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